Trade Networks in the Middle Ages, c. 1200

Illustration

Simeon Netchev
by
published on 24 May 2022

A map illustrating the interconnectivity and extent of the global trade networks at the onset of the 13th century after the centuries of decline and isolation following the collapse of the Western Roman Empire. The conditions were beginning to change, and trade between Christian and Muslim realms expanded (although still marred by a state of continuous hostilities), turning the Mediterranean once more into a bridge between the European West and the lands of North Africa and the Middle East. As Europe recovered from the destruction and mayhem of invasions and war, it had goods to sell - the export of cloth and metalworks could pay for imported silks, spices, and exotic goods from the Muslim world, Byzantine Empire, China, India, and beyond.

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About the Author

Simeon Netchev
Simeon is a freelance visual designer with a deep interest in the human side of history. He believes that every image should be an interaction, a commentary, and a narrative, and every map should lead on an exciting journey of exploration and discovery.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Netchev, S. (2022, May 24). Trade Networks in the Middle Ages, c. 1200. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/15923/trade-networks-in-the-middle-ages-c-1200/

Chicago Style

Netchev, Simeon. "Trade Networks in the Middle Ages, c. 1200." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified May 24, 2022. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/15923/trade-networks-in-the-middle-ages-c-1200/.

MLA Style

Netchev, Simeon. "Trade Networks in the Middle Ages, c. 1200." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 24 May 2022. Web. 24 Jun 2022.

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