Vix Krater

Illustration

Jeffrey King
by Karsten Wentnik
published on 13 June 2019
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The Vix Krater, a massive Greek krater, or wine-mixing vessel, found in Vix, France. This massive, 1.63 m (5'4") high bronze vessel weighs around 200kg (450lbs), making it the largest Classical Greek bronze vessel found to date. The richly ornamented krater is decorated with a frieze depicting hoplites and was made around 530 - 520 BCE. The krater is part of the "Vix Treasure", a hoard of jewelry and other metal goods from the burial of an elite Celtic woman, sometimes referred to by historians as "The Lady of Vix".

The krater was imported for use as feasting ware by the elites at the Celtic settlement near Vix, France. It is a testament to the importance of trade between the Mediterranean and Celtic Europe. On display in the Museum of Pays Châtillonnais - Trésor de Vix, in France. Image edited by Jeffrey King to improve visibility of details.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Wentnik, K. (2019, June 13). Vix Krater. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/10910/vix-krater/

Chicago Style

Wentnik, Karsten. "Vix Krater." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified June 13, 2019. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/10910/vix-krater/.

MLA Style

Wentnik, Karsten. "Vix Krater." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 13 Jun 2019. Web. 20 Jun 2021.