Poporo Quimbaya

Illustration

Edgar Serrano
by
published on 02 September 2015
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Poporo is a device used by indigenous cultures in present and pre-Columbian South America for storage of small amounts of lime. It is constituted by two pieces: the receptacle, and the lid which includes a pin that is used to carry the lime to the mouth while chewing coca leaves. Since the chewing of coca is sacred for the indigenous people, the poporos are also attributed with mystical powers and social status.

The Poporo Quimbaya shown here was found in Antioquia, Colombia in the 19th century and is an imitation of a gourd, whose rounded features were associated with the female body. It was made around 300 CE with a lost-wax casting process. This relic has been a symbol of The Gold's Museum ever since its opening (Bogota, Colombia).

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References

Cite This Work

APA Style

Serrano, E. (2015, September 02). Poporo Quimbaya. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/4046/poporo-quimbaya/

Chicago Style

Serrano, Edgar. "Poporo Quimbaya." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified September 02, 2015. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/4046/poporo-quimbaya/.

MLA Style

Serrano, Edgar. "Poporo Quimbaya." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 02 Sep 2015. Web. 27 Oct 2021.