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Bastet
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Bastet

Bastet is the Egyptian goddess of the home, domesticity, women's secrets, cats, fertility, and childbirth. She protected the home from evil spirits and disease, especially diseases associated with women and children. As with many deities...
Lysistrata
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Lysistrata

Lysistrata was the third and final of the peace plays written by the great Greek comic playwright Aristophanes (c. 445 - c. 386 BCE). Shown in 411 BCE at the Lenaea festival in Athens, it was written during the final years of the war between...
Aspasia of Miletus: The Art of Eloquence
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Aspasia of Miletus: The Art of Eloquence

Aspasia of Miletus (470-410 BCE, approximately) is best known as the consort and close companion of the great Athenian statesman Pericles. She was a metic (a person not born in Athens) and, accordingly, was not allowed to marry an Athenian...
Gender & Identity in Mulan: Text & Commentary
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Gender & Identity in Mulan: Text & Commentary

The legend of Mulan, now world-famous thanks to the Disney films of 1998 and 2020 CE, is the story of a young girl who disguises herself as a man to take her aged father's place as a conscript in the army and so preserve the family honor...
Medieval Women
Imageby Stuart

Medieval Women

Detail of carving at Peterskirche, Munich.
Daily Life in Ancient China
Articleby Emily Mark

Daily Life in Ancient China

Chinese culture is one of the oldest in the world today. Over 6,000 years ago this culture began to develop in the Yellow River Valley and many of those ancient practices are still observed in the present. The Chinese developed a society...
Hypatia of Alexandria: The Passing of Philosophy to Religion
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Hypatia of Alexandria: The Passing of Philosophy to Religion

Hypatia, the much loved pagan philosopher of Alexandria, Egypt, has long been acknowledged as the symbol of the passing of the old ways and the triumph of the new. Hypatia (370-415 CE) was the daughter of Theon, the last professor of the...
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Articleby Gayle Young

A worthy warrior queen: perceptions of Zenobia in ancient Rome

In the year 274, Romans witnessed what the Historia Augusta described as a “most brilliant spectacle” — a triumph on a lavish scale not seen in a generation. The Emperor Aurelian, rode through the city streets of Rome...
Women & The Family - Ancient Greek Society 08
Videoby Digital Diogenes

Women & The Family - Ancient Greek Society 08

Ancient Greek women had very different outcomes in life depending on where they were born, and the class they were born into. Some could be isolated, valued only for their ability to bear children. Some could be prostititutes ...and others...
Christine de Pizan
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Christine de Pizan

Christine de Pizan (also given as Christine de Pisan, l. 1364 - c. 1430 CE) was the first female professional writer of the Middle Ages and the first woman of letters in France. She was born in Venice, Italy but her family soon moved to France...