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Ten Noble and Notorious Women of Ancient Greece
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Ten Noble and Notorious Women of Ancient Greece

There were, no doubt, many notable women in ancient Greece, but history books are usually silent on female accomplishments. According to the historian and novelist Helena P. Schrader, this is because, "Herodotus and other ancient Greek...
Female Gladiators In Ancient Rome
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Female Gladiators In Ancient Rome

Female gladiators in ancient Rome – referred to by modern-day scholars as gladiatrix – may have been uncommon but they did exist. Evidence suggests that a number of women participated in the public games of Rome even though this...
Women's Work in Ancient Egypt
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Women's Work in Ancient Egypt

Women in ancient Egypt had greater rights than in any other civilization of the time. They could own land, initiate divorce, own and operate their own business, become scribes, priests, seers, dentists, and doctors. Although men were dominant...
The Women of Sparta: Athletic, Educated, and Outspoken Radicals of the Greek World
Articleby writer873

The Women of Sparta: Athletic, Educated, and Outspoken Radicals of the Greek World

The laws of Sparta were developed and written by Lycurgus, a legendary lawmaker who, in the 7th century BCE reorganized the political and social structure of the polis, transforming it into a strictly disciplined and collective society. He...
Twelve Famous Women of the Middle Ages
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Twelve Famous Women of the Middle Ages

Women in the Middle Ages were frequently characterized as second-class citizens by the Church and the patriarchal aristocracy. Women's status was somewhat elevated in the High and Late Middle Ages when the cult of the Virgin Mary, combined...
Women of Trachis
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Women of Trachis

Women of Trachis is a Greek tragedy, one of Sophocles' (c. 496 BCE - c. 406 BCE) lesser-known works, the only one that does not deal with the aftermath of the Trojan War, rather it is concerned with the death...
Ancient Christianity’s Effect on Society & Gender Roles
Articleby Rebecca Denova

Ancient Christianity’s Effect on Society & Gender Roles

Christianity began as a sect of Judaism in Judea in the 1st century CE and spread to the cities of the Eastern Roman Empire and beyond. In these cities, non-Jews, Gentiles, wanted to join the movement, and these Gentile-Christians soon outnumbered...
Warrior Women of the World of Ancient Macedon
Articleby David Grant

Warrior Women of the World of Ancient Macedon

The 8th November is celebrated as Archangels Day in Greece, but on that November day in 1977 CE something remarkable happened: an excavation team led by Professor Manolis Andronikos were roped down into the eerie gloom of an unlooted Macedonian-styled...
Ecclesiazusae
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Ecclesiazusae

The Ecclesiazusae (aka Assemblywomen) is a comedy play written by Aristophanes, one of the great Greek comic playwrights. Written sometime between 393 and 391 BCE, it is, along with his play Wealth, one of only two he wrote after the Athenian...
Female Physicians in Ancient Egypt
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Female Physicians in Ancient Egypt

A famous story from Greece relates how a young woman named Agnodice wished to become a doctor in Athens but found this forbidden. In fact, a woman practicing medicine in Athens in the 4th century BCE faced the death penalty. Refusing to give...