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Colosseum
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Colosseum

The Colosseum or Flavian Amphitheatre is a large ellipsoid arena built in the first century CE by the Flavian Roman emperors of Vespasian (69-79 CE), Titus (79-81 CE) and Domitian (81-96 CE). The arena hosted spectacular public entertainments...
Flavius Josephus
Definitionby Rebecca Denova

Flavius Josephus

Titus Flavius Josephus (36-100 CE), was born Yosef ben Matityahu and became a 1st-century CE Jewish historian. He was a member of a priestly household in Jerusalem through his father’s side (the house and order of Jehoiarib), and his mother...
Zealots
Definitionby Rebecca Denova

Zealots

The Zealots were a group of Jews who began to emerge as a religious/political movement around the beginning of the 1st century CE. They strongly opposed Roman rule and turned on everyone, including other Jews, who cooperated with Rome. A...
The Capture of Jerusalem Panel of the Franks Casket
Imageby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

The Capture of Jerusalem Panel of the Franks Casket

This is the back panel of the Franks/Auzon Casket. This panel depicts the capture of the city of Jerusalem in 70 CE by the Roman general (later Emperor) Titus. The inscription on this panel appears as a mixture of Old English, Latin, runes...
Legions of Judea
Articleby Donald L. Wasson

Legions of Judea

Judea was initially dependent on its neighbor Syria for military support until it received a Roman legion of its own in 70 CE after the Great Jewish Revolt of 66 CE. Legio X Fretensis was stationed at remains of the burned city of Jerusalem...
Masada
Definitionby Rebecca Denova

Masada

Masada (“fortress” in Hebrew) is a mountain complex in Israel in the Judean desert that overlooks the Dead Sea. It is famous for the last stand of the Zealots (and Sicarii) in the Jewish Revolt against Rome (66-73 CE). Masada...
Roman Empire
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Roman Empire

The Roman Empire, at its height (c. 117 CE), was the most extensive political and social structure in western civilization. By 285 CE the empire had grown too vast to be ruled from the central government at Rome and so was divided by Emperor...
Triumphal Arch
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Triumphal Arch

The triumphal arch was a type of Roman architectural monument built all over the empire to commemorate military triumphs and other significant events such as the accession of a new emperor. Celebrated surviving examples of triumphal arches...
Roman Games, Chariot Races & Spectacle
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Roman Games, Chariot Races & Spectacle

If there was one thing the Roman people loved it was spectacle and the opportunity of escapism offered by weird and wonderful public shows which assaulted the senses and ratcheted up the emotions. Roman rulers knew this well and so to increase...
Laocoön: The Suffering of a Trojan Priest & Its Afterlife
Articleby Cindy Meijer

Laocoön: The Suffering of a Trojan Priest & Its Afterlife

The sculpture group of Laocoön and His Sons, on display in the Vatican since its rediscovery in 1506 CE, depicts the suffering of the Trojan prince and priest Laocoön (brother of Anchises) and his young sons Antiphantes and Thymbraeus...
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