Anne Hutchinson: Religious Dissenter (Religious Freedom in Colonial New England: Part III)

Video

Joshua J. Mark
by Tom Richey
published on 18 January 2021
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Religious Freedom in Colonial New England (Part III)
Anne Hutchinson: Religious Dissenter

View Part I: https://youtu.be/IePvJ2Vlw2g
View Part II: https://youtu.be/deKlXQiwaow

In the final segment of my lecture on Religious Freedom in Colonial New England, I tell the story of Anne Hutchinson, a religious dissenter in the Massachusetts Colony who challenged gender roles and the Puritan leadership by leading Bible studies, advocating antinomianism, and claiming to be able to see the elect. Like Roger Williams before her, Anne Hutchinson was exiled from Massachusetts. She followed Williams to Rhode Island with 60 of her followers, then went on to New Netherland, where she and her children were massacred by Indians.

This content fits into the so called APUSH Period 2 and can be found in Chapter 2 or Chapter 3 of most APUSH textbooks.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Richey, T. (2021, January 18). Anne Hutchinson: Religious Dissenter (Religious Freedom in Colonial New England: Part III). World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/video/2252/anne-hutchinson-religious-dissenter-religious-free/

Chicago Style

Richey, Tom. "Anne Hutchinson: Religious Dissenter (Religious Freedom in Colonial New England: Part III)." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified January 18, 2021. https://www.worldhistory.org/video/2252/anne-hutchinson-religious-dissenter-religious-free/.

MLA Style

Richey, Tom. "Anne Hutchinson: Religious Dissenter (Religious Freedom in Colonial New England: Part III)." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 18 Jan 2021. Web. 25 Sep 2021.