Assyrian Sickle Sword

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Illustration

Arienne King
by Metropolitan Museum of Art
published on 27 February 2021
Assyrian Sickle Sword Download Full Size Image

A bronze Assyrian sickle sword that is believed to have belonged to the Assyrian king Adad Nirari I (r. 1307–1275 BCE). The blade bears the cuneiform inscription: "Palace of Adad-nirari, king of the universe, son of Arik-den-ili, king of Assyria, son of Enlil-nirari, king of Assyria". The inscription appears on both sides of the blade and along its (noncutting) edge. Both sides of the blade bear an engraving of an antelope reclining a platform. The sword likely served a ceremonial purpose as a symbol of royal power, and may not have been used in actual battle.

Made in northern Mesopotamia, c. 13th Century BCE. Length: 54.3 cm (21 in). Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Art, M. M. o. (2021, February 27). Assyrian Sickle Sword. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/13504/assyrian-sickle-sword/

Chicago Style

Art, Metropolitan Museum of. "Assyrian Sickle Sword." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified February 27, 2021. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/13504/assyrian-sickle-sword/.

MLA Style

Art, Metropolitan Museum of. "Assyrian Sickle Sword." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 27 Feb 2021. Web. 25 Jul 2024.

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