Female Worshipper Statue, Mesopotamia

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 13 October 2014
Send to Google Classroom:

Only the upper half of this clay statue of a naked woman has survived. It represent a worshipper. Traces of red color (original paint) can still be seen. She has an elaborate hair style and wears a 4-strand necklace and broad bracelets. Date and site of excavation are unknown, but probably she was found in in a temple at the city of Isin (modern-day Ishan Al-Bahriyat, Al-Qadisiyyah Governorate, Iraq, southern Mesopotamia). Old Babylonian period, 2000-1750 BCE. (The British Musuem, London).

Remove Ads

Advertisement

About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2014, October 13). Female Worshipper Statue, Mesopotamia. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/3138/female-worshipper-statue-mesopotamia/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Female Worshipper Statue, Mesopotamia." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified October 13, 2014. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/3138/female-worshipper-statue-mesopotamia/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Female Worshipper Statue, Mesopotamia." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 13 Oct 2014. Web. 23 Oct 2021.