Witchcraft in Europe: Crash Course

Video

John Horgan
by CrashCourse
published on 18 April 2021
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During our last several episodes, Europe and the European-controlled world have been in crisis. Wars, disease, climate changes, and shifts in religious and political power threw the European world into turmoil. People were looking for a scapegoat, and for many it was a time of magical thinking. So, maybe witches were responsible for all the problems? It was a popular idea, but, alas, the witches weren't responsible.

Sources:
Godbeer, Richard, ed. The Salem Witch Hunt: A Brief History with Documents. Boston: Bedford/ St. Martin’s, 2018.

Kupperman, Karen. Indians and English: Facing Off in Early America. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2000. Plus additional personal communications.

Parker, Geoffrey. Global Crisis: War, Climate Change, and Catastrophe in the Seventeenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013.

Roper, Lyndall. Oedipus and the Devil: Witchcraft, Sexuality and Religion in Early Modern Europe. London: Routledge, 1994.

Roper, Lyndal. The Witch in the Western Imagination, Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012.

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APA Style

CrashCourse, . (2021, April 18). Witchcraft in Europe: Crash Course. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/video/2433/witchcraft-in-europe-crash-course/

Chicago Style

CrashCourse, . "Witchcraft in Europe: Crash Course." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified April 18, 2021. https://www.worldhistory.org/video/2433/witchcraft-in-europe-crash-course/.

MLA Style

CrashCourse, . "Witchcraft in Europe: Crash Course." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 18 Apr 2021. Web. 16 Sep 2021.