Gyotaku: The ancient Japanese art of printing fish - K. Erica Dodge

Video

Arienne King
by TED-Ed
published on 25 May 2019
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How did fishermen record their trophy catches before the invention of photography? In 19th century Japan, fishing boats were equipped with rice paper, sumi-e ink, and brushes in order to create gyoktaku: elaborate rubbings of freshly caught fish. K. Erica Dodge recounts the story of this competitive fishing culture, plus some tips on how to make your very own etchings.

Lesson by K. Erica Dodge, animation by Franco Barroeta.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

TED-Ed, . (2019, May 25). Gyotaku: The ancient Japanese art of printing fish - K. Erica Dodge. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/video/1748/gyotaku-the-ancient-japanese-art-of-printing-fish/

Chicago Style

TED-Ed, . "Gyotaku: The ancient Japanese art of printing fish - K. Erica Dodge." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified May 25, 2019. https://www.worldhistory.org/video/1748/gyotaku-the-ancient-japanese-art-of-printing-fish/.

MLA Style

TED-Ed, . "Gyotaku: The ancient Japanese art of printing fish - K. Erica Dodge." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 25 May 2019. Web. 17 Jun 2021.