Silver Largitio Dish with the Name of Licinius

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 02 October 2016
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This object is associated with a late Roman emperor, who was at the heart of the changing Roman Empire. This silver dish names Licinius in its Latin inscription. Licinius co-ruled with Constantine the Great during early 300s, but their collaboration descended into civil war which ended with Constantine defeating Licinius and seizing control of of the entire Roman Empire. The dish was probably given to a follower of Licinius on his 10th anniversary as an Emperor through the Late Roman practice of largitio, whereby Emperors distributed silver plate, coins, and other luxuries on ceremonial occasions. Circa 317 CE. From Nis, modern-day Serbia. (The British Museum, London).

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2016, October 02). Silver Largitio Dish with the Name of Licinius. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/5757/silver-largitio-dish-with-the-name-of-licinius/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Silver Largitio Dish with the Name of Licinius." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified October 02, 2016. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/5757/silver-largitio-dish-with-the-name-of-licinius/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Silver Largitio Dish with the Name of Licinius." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 02 Oct 2016. Web. 27 Oct 2021.