Cheyenne

Definition

The Cheyenne are a North American Native nation, originally from the Great Lakes region, who migrated to modern-day Minnesota and then to areas in North Dakota and further southwest. They are associated with the Plains Indians culture and, after mastering the horse, became one of the most powerful nations of the American West.

More about: Cheyenne

Timeline

  • c. 1680
    Cheyenne live sedentary life in permanent villages before migrating to the Great Plains.
  • c. 1700 - c. 1825
    Cheyenne have mastered the horse and become one of the most powerful Plains Indians nations of the west.
  • 1825 - 1851
    Treaties with the US Government restrict Cheyenne land rights and practice of cultural traditions.
  • 1864 - 1869
    Slaughter of Cheyenne by US Government troops and citizen militia encourage war.
  • 1869
    Cheyenne Dog Soldiers defeated and Chief Tall Bull killed at the Battle of Summit Springs; Dog Soldiers' strength broken.
  • 1876
    Cheyenne and Arapaho join with Sioux in the great victory at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.
  • 1878
    Cheyenne chiefs Morning Star (Dull Knife) and Little Wolf lead their people from the Oklahoma Reservation back to ancestral lands in the Northern Cheyenne Exodus.
Membership