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The Nimrud Ivories: Their Discovery & History
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Nimrud Ivories: Their Discovery & History

In 1845 CE, the archaeologist Austen Henry Layard began excavations at the ruins of the city of Nimrud in the region which is northern Iraq in the present day. Layard's expedition was part of a larger movement at the time to uncover ancient...
The Nimrud Dogs
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Nimrud Dogs

The Nimrud Dogs, five canine figurines found at the ancient Mesopotamian city of Nimrud, were only a few of the many startling finds in the region during the 19th century when expeditions were sent to corroborate biblical narratives through...
Wall Reliefs: Apkallus of the North-West Palace at Nimrud
Articleby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Wall Reliefs: Apkallus of the North-West Palace at Nimrud

Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of a heartless world, and the soul of soulless conditions. It is the opium of the people. (Karl Marx, Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right). When it comes to religion...
Kalhu / Nimrud
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Kalhu / Nimrud

Kalhu (also known as Caleh, Calah, and Nimrud, in modern-day northern Iraq) was a city in ancient Mesopotamia that became the capital of the Assyrian Empire under Ashurnasirpal II (reigned 884-859 BCE) who moved the central government there...
Ancient Israelite Art
Definitionby William Brown

Ancient Israelite Art

Ancient Israelite art traditions are evident especially on stamps seals, ivories from Samaria, and carvings, each with motifs connecting it to more general artistic traditions throughout the Levant. Ancient Israel, and therefore its art...
Wall Reliefs: Ashurnasirpal II's War Scenes at the British Museum
Articleby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Wall Reliefs: Ashurnasirpal II's War Scenes at the British Museum

The Mighty King 600 of their warriors I put to the sword and decapitated; 400 I took alive; 3,000 captives I brought forth; I took possession of the city for myself: the living soldiers, and heads to the city of Amidi the royal city...
The Iraq Museum: A Brightness in the Darkness
Articleby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

The Iraq Museum: A Brightness in the Darkness

For whom have I labored? For whom have I journeyed? For whom have I suffered? I have gained absolutely nothing for myself, I have only profited the snake, the ground lion! The Epic of Gilgamesh, Tablet XI This is how...
Woman at the Window Ivory from Nimrud
Imageby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Woman at the Window Ivory from Nimrud

A woman looking out of a balustraded window was a popular theme in Phoenician art. This is possibly related to the goddess Astarte and ritual prostitution. This piece belongs to a large collection of the so-called "Nimrud ivories." These...
Ivory Figure of Syrian Man with an Ostrich & Goat, Nimrud
Imageby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Ivory Figure of Syrian Man with an Ostrich & Goat, Nimrud

This burned ivory figure, carved in the round, depicts a male figure carrying a goat on his shoulders and holding an ostrich by the neck. The depiction is very realistic; the beak of the ostrich is opened and the front wing is held upwards...
Ivory Statue from Nimrud at the Iraq Museum
Imageby Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Ivory Statue from Nimrud at the Iraq Museum

This carved ivory statue was made of different ivory pieces, which were joined together. The legs are now missing. It depicts an adult Assyrian beardless male figure. He stands in a gesture of worship. It was found (by an Iraqi team in the...