Woman at the Window Ivory from Nimrud

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 26 July 2014

A woman looking out of a balustraded window was a popular theme in Phoenician art. This is possibly related to the goddess Astarte and ritual prostitution. This piece belongs to a large collection of the so-called "Nimrud ivories." These carved ivories decorated luxury furniture, boxes, and horse harnesses. Neo-Assyrian period, 9th-7th centuries BCE, from Nimrud (ancient Kalhu; Biblical Calah), Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London).

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2014, July 26). Woman at the Window Ivory from Nimrud. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/2871/woman-at-the-window-ivory-from-nimrud/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Woman at the Window Ivory from Nimrud." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified July 26, 2014. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/2871/woman-at-the-window-ivory-from-nimrud/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Woman at the Window Ivory from Nimrud." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 26 Jul 2014. Web. 26 May 2022.

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