The Pseudo Dolmen of Avola

Illustration

Salvatore Piccolo
by
published on 06 November 2017
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The Pseudo Dolmen of Avola, so called because of doubts about its real nature. The monument is near the town of Avola, in south-eastern Sicily. The building, surrounded by dense and wild vegetation, essentially rests on two "pillars". It measures eight meters long and five and a half wide. On the surface of the slab, there are ten small rectangular incisions, perhaps tombs for children used in Greek or Paleochristian times. There are no dating items.

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About the Author

Salvatore Piccolo
Salvatore Piccolo is an archaeologist. His excavations include the dolmens of Sicily where in "Cava dei Servi", he found human remains and ceramic fragments that have unravelled the mystery of the function and chronology of Mediterranean dolmens.

References

  • Salvatore Piccolo. Ancient Stones: The Prehistoric Dolmens of Sicily. UK: Thornam/Norfolk, 2013

Cite This Work

APA Style

Piccolo, S. (2017, November 06). The Pseudo Dolmen of Avola. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/7539/the-pseudo-dolmen-of-avola/

Chicago Style

Piccolo, Salvatore. "The Pseudo Dolmen of Avola." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified November 06, 2017. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/7539/the-pseudo-dolmen-of-avola/.

MLA Style

Piccolo, Salvatore. "The Pseudo Dolmen of Avola." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 06 Nov 2017. Web. 14 Oct 2021.