Greek Double Aulos

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Illustration

Mark Cartwright
by
published on 12 June 2012

The ancient Greek double aulos (diaulos) consisted of two pipes (auloi) attached at the mouthpiece and sometimes held in place with a leather strap (forveia) to the player's face. The pipes could be of equal length or unequal, the latter giving a double, supporting melody. The sound produced was rich, rhythmical and penetrating, often in support to a male chorus. (Museum of Musical Instruments, Katakalon, Greece)

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About the Author

Mark Cartwright
Mark is a full-time author, researcher, historian, and editor. Special interests include art, architecture, and discovering the ideas that all civilizations share. He holds an MA in Political Philosophy and is the WHE Publishing Director.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Cartwright, M. (2012, June 12). Greek Double Aulos. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/686/greek-double-aulos/

Chicago Style

Cartwright, Mark. "Greek Double Aulos." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified June 12, 2012. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/686/greek-double-aulos/.

MLA Style

Cartwright, Mark. "Greek Double Aulos." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 12 Jun 2012. Web. 05 Feb 2023.

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