Partially Reconstructed Shield from Sutton Hoo

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 04 October 2016
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This is the most elaborate shield to survive from Anglo-Saxon England. The metal rim and gilded copper alloy, gold and garnet fittings are unusual. The central iron boss protected the user's hand, while mounts depicting a bird of prey and dragon probably gave symbolic protection. The original board, made from lime wood covered with animal hide has perished and is replaced by a modern replica. Like the Sutton Hoo Helmet, the shield is similar to others found in eastern Sweden, particularly the iron boss and decorative strips on the front, and the animal-headed grip-mounts on the back. This suggests common cultural traditions and interactions between East Anglia and Eastern Sweden at that time. Donated by Mrs. Edith M. Pretty. Early 600s CE. From the ship-burial mound 1 at Sutton Hoo, Suffolk, England, UK. (The British Museum, London).

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2016, October 04). Partially Reconstructed Shield from Sutton Hoo. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/5786/partially-reconstructed-shield-from-sutton-hoo/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Partially Reconstructed Shield from Sutton Hoo." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified October 04, 2016. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/5786/partially-reconstructed-shield-from-sutton-hoo/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Partially Reconstructed Shield from Sutton Hoo." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 04 Oct 2016. Web. 24 Sep 2021.