Egyptian Relief of Princess Sitamun, daughter of Amenhotp III

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 21 March 2016
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This is a sandstone block fragment which was brought from the temple of Egyptian king Amenhotep II. The temple lies on the west bank of the Nile river at Thebes. There is a raised relief, depicting the head of Princess Sitamun, daughter of Amenhotep III. She wears a vulture headdress and holds a floral scepter. From Thebes, Egypt. Reign of Amenhotep III, 18th Dynasty, circa 1391–1353 BCE. The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, London (With thanks to The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL).

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2016, March 21). Egyptian Relief of Princess Sitamun, daughter of Amenhotp III. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/4708/egyptian-relief-of-princess-sitamun-daughter-of-am/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Egyptian Relief of Princess Sitamun, daughter of Amenhotp III." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified March 21, 2016. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/4708/egyptian-relief-of-princess-sitamun-daughter-of-am/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Egyptian Relief of Princess Sitamun, daughter of Amenhotp III." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 21 Mar 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2021.