Catherine the Great and the Russian Empire, c. 1796

Illustration

Simeon Netchev
by
published on 28 September 2023
Catherine the Great and the Russian Empire, c. 1796 Download Full Size Image

A map illustrating the state of the Russian Empire, c. 1796, during the reign of Ekaterina II Alekseyevna (born Princess Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst), commonly known as Catherine the Great. Longest ruling Russian Empress (1762 – 1796), she continued the policies of Peter the Great both culturally and militarily, establishing educational reform, championing the arts and architecture, and aggressively extending imperial borders in the most significant territorial gain since Ivan the Terrible.

Catherine's reign witnessed multiple conflicts with the Ottoman Empire and the annexation and assimilation of Crimea. It also played a pivotal role in the partitions of Poland (Russia, Prussia, and Austria engaged in a series of territorial partitions of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in the late 18th century), leading to the loss of Polish sovereignty, altering the map of Europe and leaving a lasting imprint on the broader geopolitical landscape.

Remove Ads
Advertisement
Subscribe to this author

About the Author

Simeon Netchev
Simeon is a freelance visual designer with a deep interest in the human side of history. He believes that every image should be an interaction, a commentary, and a narrative, and every map should lead on an exciting journey of exploration and discovery.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Netchev, S. (2023, September 28). Catherine the Great and the Russian Empire, c. 1796. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/17952/catherine-the-great-and-the-russian-empire-c-1796/

Chicago Style

Netchev, Simeon. "Catherine the Great and the Russian Empire, c. 1796." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified September 28, 2023. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/17952/catherine-the-great-and-the-russian-empire-c-1796/.

MLA Style

Netchev, Simeon. "Catherine the Great and the Russian Empire, c. 1796." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 28 Sep 2023. Web. 25 May 2024.

Membership