Ancient History Encyclopedia has a new name!

We are now World History Encyclopedia to better reflect the breadth of our non-profit organization's mission. Learn More

Law: Did you mean...?

Filters

You can refine the search results by selecting any of the filters below.

Clear Filters

Types

Categories

Periods

Subjects

Regions

Search

Roman Law
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Roman Law

Roman law, as revealed through ancient legal texts, literature, papyri, wax tablets and inscriptions, covered such facets of everyday Roman life as crime and punishment, land and property ownership, commerce, the maritime and agricultural...
Draco's Law Code
Definitionby Antonios Loizides

Draco's Law Code

Draco was an aristocrat who in 7th century BCE Athens was handed the task of composing a new body of laws. We have no particular clues concerning his life and general biography and the only certainty is that, as an aristocrat and an educated...
Ancient Egyptian Law
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Ancient Egyptian Law

Ancient Egyptian culture flourished through adherence to tradition and their legal system followed this same paradigm. Basic laws and legal proscriptions were in place in Egypt as early as the Predynastic Period (c. 6000- c. 3150 BCE) and...
Twelve Tables
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Twelve Tables

The Twelve Tables (aka Law of the Twelve Tables) was a set of laws inscribed on 12 bronze tablets created in ancient Rome in 451 and 450 BCE. They were the beginning of a new approach to laws where they would be passed by government and written...
Balance & the Law in Ancient Egypt
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Balance & the Law in Ancient Egypt

Egyptian law was based on the central cultural value of ma'at (harmony and balance) which was the foundation for the entire civilization. Ma'at was established at the beginning of time by the gods when the earth and universe were formed...
Corpus Juris Civilis
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Corpus Juris Civilis

The Justinian Code or Corpus Juris Civilis (Corpus of Civil Law) was a major reform of Byzantine law created by Emperor Justinian I (r. 527-565 CE) in 528-9 CE. Aiming to clarify and update the old Roman laws, eradicate inconsistencies and...
Hammurabi's Code: Babylonian Law Set in Stone
Articleby writer873

Hammurabi's Code: Babylonian Law Set in Stone

Hammurabi was the first king of the Babylonian Empire, reigning from 1792 B.C. – 1750 B.C. During his time in power, he conquered Sumer and Akkad, amassing those cultures for his territory. He is probably best known for...
Paul the Apostle
Definitionby Rebecca Denova

Paul the Apostle

Paul was a follower of Jesus Christ who famously converted to Christianity on the road to Damascus after persecuting the very followers of the community that he joined. However, as we will see, Paul is better described as one of the founders...
Medieval Icelandic Government
Definitionby Irina Manea

Medieval Icelandic Government

Early medieval Icelandic government, or Viking Iceland, has been termed an incipient form of democracy or democratic parliamentarism, however, the system was actually nothing like its European counterparts, be they medieval or contemporary...
Legacy of the Ancient Romans
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Legacy of the Ancient Romans

The legacy of the ancient Romans – from both the time of the Roman Republic (509-27 BCE) and the time of the Roman Empire (27 BCE - 476 CE) – exerted a significant influence on succeeding cultures and is still felt around the...