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Why is Aristophanes called the Father of Comedy?
Video by TED-Ed

Why is Aristophanes called the Father of Comedy?

Learn more about TED's Student Talks program here: http://bit.ly/2MUY1KK View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-is-aristophanes-called-the-father-of-comedy-mark-robinson Aristophanes, often referred to as the Father of Comedy...
Comic Scene, Bell-krater, Paestum
Image by Trustees of the British Museum

Comic Scene, Bell-krater, Paestum

A red-figure bell-krater from Paestum 360-340 BCE. In a scene from Greek comedy, Dionysos is depicted with a comic actor balancing a basket on his head. The actor is in typical costume - padded stomach, added phallus and bearded mask.
Ancient Greek Dance
Definition by Nathalie Choubineh

Ancient Greek Dance

In ancient Greece, dance had a significant presence in everyday life. The Greeks not only danced on many different occasions, but they also recognized several non-performative activities such as ball-playing or rhythmic physical exercise...
Hippolytus
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Hippolytus

Hippolytus is a tragedy written by Euripides (c. 484-407 BCE), one of the great Greek playwrights of the early 5th century BCE. As with many tragedies of the era, the central focus of Hippolytus is humanity's relationship with the gods. Hippolytus...
Medea (Play)
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Medea (Play)

The tragedy Medea was written in 431 BCE by Euripides (c. 484 – 407 BCE). Euripides authored at least 90 plays of which 19 have survived intact. As with the plays by Sophocles and Aeschylus, the audience was already well aware of the myth...
Greek Terracotta Comedy Mask
Image by Mark Cartwright

Greek Terracotta Comedy Mask

A terracotta comedy mask, 200-250 BCE. (Agora Museum, Athens)
Old Silenus
Image by Mark Cartwright

Old Silenus

A statue of a comic actor in the costume of Old Silenus, a companion and teacher of Dionysos, the god of wine. He holds a drum and has an empty wine skin over his shoulder. 2nd-1st century BCE, Delos. (Site Museum, Delos)
Diphilus
Image by Mark Cartwright

Diphilus

A marble portrait bust of the Greek comedy poet Diphilus. 1st century CE copy of a 4th century BCE Greek original. (Palazzo Massimo, Rome)
Roman Mosaic of Thalia
Image by Mark Cartwright

Roman Mosaic of Thalia

A Roman mosaic of Thalia, Muse of comedy. 2nd century CE, Tarraco. (Archaeological Museum, Tarragona, Spain)
Satyr
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Satyr

Satyrs (aka silens) are figures from Greek mythology who were followers of the god of wine Dionysos. Satyrs were often guilty of excessive sexual desires and overindulgence of wine. Men with a horse's tail and ears or men with goat legs...
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