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Arts and Culture in Ancient Greece
Quiz by Patrick Goodman

Arts and Culture in Ancient Greece

Aesychlus Aristophanes Base Capital Chorus Comedy Corinthian column Dionysus Doric column Drama Entablature Entasis Euripides Frieze Ionic column Metope Pediment Philosophy Satyr play Shaft Skene Sophocles Tragedy Triglyph Socrates Plato...
Ancient Greek Inventions
Article by Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Inventions

The ancient Greeks are often credited with building the foundations upon which all western cultures are built, and this impressive accolade stems from their innovative contributions to a wide range of human activities, from sports to medicine...
Seat from the Theatre of Dionysos, Athens
Image by Mark Cartwright

Seat from the Theatre of Dionysos, Athens

One of the special front seats from the Theatre of Dionysos, on the slopes of the acropolis of Athens. Second half of the 4th century BCE. The theatre was orginally constructed in the 6th century BCE.
Ancient Greek Comedy: History, Structure, Aristophanes and Menander
Video by Kelly Macquire

Ancient Greek Comedy: History, Structure, Aristophanes and Menander

The origin of Ancient Greek comedy has been lost to time, however, we know from pottery depicting men as actors dressing up in wild costumes that it was a firmly established genre by the 6th century BCE. Ancient Greek comedy can be split...
Thesmophoriazusae
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Thesmophoriazusae

The Thesmophoriazusae (also called The Poet & the Women or Women at the Thesmophoria) is a two-act comedy play written in 411 BCE by the great Greek comic playwright, Aristophanes. The play's principal focus is on the Greek tragedian...
The Art & Culture of Ancient Greece
Collection by Mark Cartwright

The Art & Culture of Ancient Greece

The ancient Greeks were masters at picking up ideas from other cultures, mixing these with their own innovations and producing unique contributions to world culture. Greek sculptors adored the human form, painters loved to tell stories on...
Xanthias from 'The Frogs
Image by The British Museum

Xanthias from 'The Frogs

A red-figure vessel depicting Xanthias, the slave of Dionysos in the 405 BCE Greek comedy play 'The Frogs' by Aristophanes. Mid-4th century BCE, Campania. (British Museum, London)
Roman Literature
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Roman Literature

The Roman Empire and its predecessor the Roman Republic produced an abundance of celebrated literature; poetry, comedies, dramas, histories, and philosophical tracts; the Romans avoided tragedies. Much of it survives to this day. However...
Oedipus the King
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Oedipus the King

Oedipus the King (429-420 BCE), also known as Oedipus Rex or Oedipus Tyrannos ('Tyrannos' signifies that the throne was not gained through an inheritance) is the most famous surviving play written by the 5th-century BCE poet and dramatist...
Red-figure Hydria
Image by Mark Cartwright

Red-figure Hydria

A red-figure hydria by the Kleophon Painter, 440-430 BCE. The scene depicts women dressing. (National Archaeological Museum, Athens)
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