Adriaen de Vries's Bronze Casting Technique: Direct Lost-Wax Method

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Video

Mark Cartwright
by Getty Museum
published on 19 February 2016

Adriaen de Vries most often used a technique called "direct lost-wax casting." During the casting process, the wax of the original wax-and-clay model melts out, or is "lost," hence the technique's name. Because the model disappears, each bronze cast produced is a unique original. If the casting fails, the sculptor must begin again. Thus, only the most confident sculptors worked in this method.

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Learn more about de Vries's traditional direct lost-wax approach: http://bit.ly/z4itlA

Read a biography of Adrien de Vries from the Getty Museum: http://bit.ly/ApZgky

Description of Juggling Man by Adrien de Vries: http://bit.ly/wpgHM9

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Museum, G. (2016, February 19). Adriaen de Vries's Bronze Casting Technique: Direct Lost-Wax Method. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/video/755/adriaen-de-vriess-bronze-casting-technique-direct/

Chicago Style

Museum, Getty. "Adriaen de Vries's Bronze Casting Technique: Direct Lost-Wax Method." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified February 19, 2016. https://www.worldhistory.org/video/755/adriaen-de-vriess-bronze-casting-technique-direct/.

MLA Style

Museum, Getty. "Adriaen de Vries's Bronze Casting Technique: Direct Lost-Wax Method." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 19 Feb 2016. Web. 17 Jul 2024.

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