The Human Body in Ancient Greek Art and Thought

Video

Jan van der Crabben
by Portland Art Museum
published on 10 June 2014
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IAN JENKINS, PH.D.
SENIOR CURATOR, DEPARTMENT OF GREECE AND ROME, BRITISH MUSEUM

Jenkins explores Greek notions of ideal beauty in both nude and draped images of the male and female human bodies. He contrasts the moral aesthetic of sound mind in sound body with other representations to show how the human form served as a bearer of many meanings. Anthropomorphic gods, larger than life heroes, part-human part-animal monsters of myth are all considered as a visual language. His talk concludes with the legacy of the Greek experience in the Roman era and its transmission to the present day.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Museum, P. A. (2014, June 10). The Human Body in Ancient Greek Art and Thought. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/video/493/the-human-body-in-ancient-greek-art-and-thought/

Chicago Style

Museum, Portland Art. "The Human Body in Ancient Greek Art and Thought." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified June 10, 2014. https://www.worldhistory.org/video/493/the-human-body-in-ancient-greek-art-and-thought/.

MLA Style

Museum, Portland Art. "The Human Body in Ancient Greek Art and Thought." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 10 Jun 2014. Web. 18 Oct 2021.