Caesarea (North Africa)

Definition

Caesarea was actually the name of three separate cities: one in Palestine, one in Cappadocia (Asia Minor), and one in Mauretania, present-day Algeria. The first city, Caesarea Palestinae, was built by Herod around 25 BCE and, like the other two cities, was named for Roman emperor Augustus (r. 27 BCE - 14 CE). It served as an administrative capital for the province, and in the 1st century CE, Emperor Vespasian (r. 69-79 CE) made it a colonia. The city would later become the capital of Judea. The second city, Caesarea Cappadocia was captured by Alexander the Great on his quest to conquer the Persian Empire. It was made a province in 17 CE by Emperor Tiberius (r. 14-37 CE). Lastly, originally named Iol, Caesarea Mauretania lay along the northern coast of Africa near the present-day city of Algiers.

More about: Caesarea (North Africa)

Timeline

  • 33 BCE
    Caesarea Mauretania annexed by Rome.
  • 44 CE
    Caesarea made capital of imperial province.
  • 429 CE
    Vandals overrun Caesarea.
  • 523 CE
    Emperor Justinian seizes Caesarea.
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