Search Results: Roman Warfare

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Romulus and Remus
Definitionby Brittany Garcia

Romulus and Remus

In Roman mythology, Romulus and his twin brother Remus were the founders of the city of Rome. They were the children of Rhea Silvia and Mars (or in some variations the demi-god hero Hercules) and their story is recorded by many authors including...
The Romans Flooded the Colosseum for Sea Battles - Janelle Peters
Videoby TED-Ed

The Romans Flooded the Colosseum for Sea Battles - Janelle Peters

Dig in to the history of the Roman Empire’s staged gladiatorial naval battles and how they flooded the Colosseum to reenact famous battles. — Starting in 80 CE, residents of Rome and visitors from across the Roman Empire would...
Temple
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Temple

A temple (from the Latin 'templum') is a structure usually built for the purpose of, and always dedicated to, religious or spiritual activities including prayer, meditation, sacrifice and worship. The templum was a sacred precinct defined...
The Battle of Pydna
Imageby Web Gallery of Art

The Battle of Pydna

The Battle of Pydna by Andrea del Verrocchio, 1475 CE, Musée Jacquemart-André, Paris
Serapis
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Serapis

Serapis is a Graeco-Egyptian god of the Ptolemaic Period (323-30 BCE) of Egypt developed by the monarch Ptolemy I Soter (r. 305-282 BCE) as part of his vision to unite his Egyptian and Greek subjects. Serapis’ cult later spread throughout...
Silver in Antiquity
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Silver in Antiquity

Silver had great value and aesthetic appeal in many ancient cultures where it was used to make jewellery, tableware, figurines, ritual objects and rough-cut pieces known as hacksilver which could be used in trade or to store wealth. The metal...
Galen
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Galen

Galen (129-216 CE) was a Greek physician, author, and philosopher, working in Rome, who influenced both medical theory and practice until the middle of the 17th century CE. Owning a large, personal library, he wrote hundreds of medical treatises...
Suetonius
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Suetonius

Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus (c. 69 – c. 130/140 CE), better known simply as Suetonius, was a Roman writer whose most famous work is his biographies of the first 12 Caesars. With a position close to the imperial court he was able to...
Celtic Coinage
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Celtic Coinage

The coinage of the ancient Celts, minted from the early 3rd century BCE to the 1st century CE, at first imitated Greek and then Roman coins. Celtic engravers then soon developed their own unique style, creating distinctive coins with depictions...
Galba
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Galba

Galba was Roman emperor from June 68 to January 69 CE. With the death of Emperor Nero on June 9, 68 CE, the Julio-Claudian dynasty officially ended, leaving the Roman Empire without a clear successor to the throne. With the assistance of...