Kilted Woman from Khafajah

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 09 December 2018
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Limestone statue of a Sumerian female. The head/neck, both arms and forearms, and the feet are lost. Only the clasped hands (in a gesture of prayer), in front of the lower chest, have survived. The upper half of the body is naked; the breasts are small but prominent. The figure wears the Sumerian kilt, wrapped around the waist. Donated by an unidentified person to the Iraqi Museum in Baghdad; unknown date. IM47182, SM182; the statue was not marked with the Khafajah's "Kh" excavation number of the Oriental Institute. From Khafajah (also Khafaje; ancient Tutub), Dyala Governorate, Iraq. Early Dynastic Period, 2900-2350 BCE. (The Sulaymaniyah Museum, Iraqi Kurdistan).

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2018, December 09). Kilted Woman from Khafajah. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/9690/kilted-woman-from-khafajah/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Kilted Woman from Khafajah." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified December 09, 2018. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/9690/kilted-woman-from-khafajah/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Kilted Woman from Khafajah." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 09 Dec 2018. Web. 20 Jun 2021.