Latin Inscription from Jordan

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 02 April 2018
Send to Google Classroom:

This Latin inscription gives us clues about an ancient Roman fort and settlement in modern-day Aqaba, southern Jordan. This rare discovery was found in 2013 CE. It weighs about 225 kilograms and was mounted on the fort's main gate, as a tribute to the important Roman leaders of the day. Latin was the official language of the Roman Empire, which spread across Jordan from 63 BCE to 324 CE. The text reads "For perpetual peace. The Emperors Diocletian and Maximalianus and the Caesars Constantinus and Maximianus stationed in this place the Cohors II Galatarum through the foresight of Priscus, governor of the Province...Palestina". The Arabic graffiti was added later, during the Islamic period. Roman Period, 293-303 CE. From modern-day Aqaba, Jordan Hashemite Kingdom. (The Jordan Museum, Amman, Jordan).

Remove Ads

Advertisement

About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2018, April 02). Latin Inscription from Jordan. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/8506/latin-inscription-from-jordan/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Latin Inscription from Jordan." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified April 02, 2018. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/8506/latin-inscription-from-jordan/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Latin Inscription from Jordan." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 02 Apr 2018. Web. 19 Oct 2021.