Inscribed lintel from Silwan

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 06 September 2017
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This lintel was part of a rock-cut tomb. The text, inscribed in Hebrew, mentions that this tomb belongs to the "royal steward" and that there is no gold or silver inside it, just his bones and those of his maid-servants. Although the lintel is broken where the name of the official was inscribed, it is thought that this is the tomb of Shebna, the royal steward of King Hezekiah of Juda. It may be the tomb mentioned in the Bible (Isaiah xxii, 15, 16) where the prophet rebukes a royal steward named Shebna for building himself a too conspicuous tomb. 7th century BCE. From Silwan (Shiloah, Siloam) near Jerusalem, modern-day Israel. (The British Museum, London)

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2017, September 06). Inscribed lintel from Silwan. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/7199/inscribed-lintel-from-silwan/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Inscribed lintel from Silwan." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified September 06, 2017. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/7199/inscribed-lintel-from-silwan/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Inscribed lintel from Silwan." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 06 Sep 2017. Web. 22 Oct 2021.