Carved Ivory from Samaria

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 08 September 2017
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This carved piece of ivory, in a Phoenician style, is part of large number of ivories which were found in the city of Samaria during the excavations of J. W. Crowfoot in 1931-1935 CE. They consist, for the most part, of furniture inlays, and although they were not recovered from rooms of the palace, but from rubbish pits near its enclosing wall, it would be reasonable to associate them with the Biblical traditions of Ahab's "Ivory House" (I King, xxii, 39). From Samaria, modern-day Israel. Lent by the Palestine Exploration Fund. (British Museum in London)

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2017, September 08). Carved Ivory from Samaria. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/7210/carved-ivory-from-samaria/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Carved Ivory from Samaria." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified September 08, 2017. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/7210/carved-ivory-from-samaria/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Carved Ivory from Samaria." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 08 Sep 2017. Web. 18 Sep 2021.