Grinding Stone from Nabta Playa

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 29 September 2016
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Seeds and wild grasses were processed with round or oval grinders (manos) of hard quartzitic sandstone. These were rubbed against a larger mill stone to make flour. A depression in the lower stone's surface prevented spillage. The abundance of grinding stones shows that plant food made up a significant part of the diet at this time. From Nabta Playa E75-6, Western Desert, Egypt. Middle Neolithic. (The British Museum, London).

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2016, September 29). Grinding Stone from Nabta Playa. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/5715/grinding-stone-from-nabta-playa/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Grinding Stone from Nabta Playa." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified September 29, 2016. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/5715/grinding-stone-from-nabta-playa/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Grinding Stone from Nabta Playa." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 29 Sep 2016. Web. 17 Oct 2021.