The making and worship of Ganesha statues in Maharashtra

Video

Mark Cartwright
by The British Museum
published on 07 February 2016
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Made to accompany From temple to home: celebrating Ganesha, a display at the British Museum from 27 February — 25 May 2014

http://www.britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/celebrating_ganesha.aspx

Explore the iconography of and find out how he is celebrated across India.

The elephant-headed Ganesha is one of the most popular Hindu gods — the creator and remover of obstacles. The main stone sculpture in the display was carved from schist around 800 years ago and was originally positioned on the outside of a temple in the eastern state of Orissa (recently renamed Odisha). The display brings this sculpture together with other more recent depictions of Ganesha created for different purposes. Among these are the temporary statues created every year for the Ganeshchaturthi festival in Mumbai, which are placed in public or domestic shrines before being immersed in water at the end of the celebrations.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Museum, T. B. (2016, February 07). The making and worship of Ganesha statues in Maharashtra. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/video/677/the-making-and-worship-of-ganesha-statues-in-mahar/

Chicago Style

Museum, The British. "The making and worship of Ganesha statues in Maharashtra." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified February 07, 2016. https://www.worldhistory.org/video/677/the-making-and-worship-of-ganesha-statues-in-mahar/.

MLA Style

Museum, The British. "The making and worship of Ganesha statues in Maharashtra." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 07 Feb 2016. Web. 24 Oct 2021.