Marble Lion, Mausoleum at Halicarnassus

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 29 May 2016
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This is the most complete of the surviving lions from the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, also known as the Tomb of Mausolus. The lions probably stood at the base of the stepped-pyramid roof, acting as both protective and royal symbols. There were more males than female lions, although a lioness found in the walls of the castle of St Peter at Bodrum and now in Istanbul Archaeological Museums, probably belongs to the series. Circa, 250 BCE. (The British Museum, London)

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2016, May 29). Marble Lion, Mausoleum at Halicarnassus. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/5088/marble-lion-mausoleum-at-halicarnassus/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Marble Lion, Mausoleum at Halicarnassus." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified May 29, 2016. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/5088/marble-lion-mausoleum-at-halicarnassus/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Marble Lion, Mausoleum at Halicarnassus." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 29 May 2016. Web. 18 Oct 2021.