The Foothills of Mt. Chortiatis, Greece

Illustration

Athanasios Fountoukis
by
published on 03 June 2022

The landscape from the top of Mt. Chortiatis. In the background, the hinterland of the mountainous Chalcidice emerges. In antiquity, the mountain was called Cissus, which means ivy. The locals could have chosen the mountain's name either for the abundance of the plant in the region or after the legendary Thracian King Cisseus. According to Homer, his daughter married the Trojan Antenor and bore Iphidamas. The grandson of the Thracian king was eventually killed by Agamemnon during the Trojan War.

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About the Author

Athanasios Fountoukis
A historian, who currently studies at the University of Groningen for his Master's degree in Classics and Ancient Civilizations with a track on Ancient History, focusing on the history of the Mediterranean Sea in the Archaic Era.

References

Cite This Work

APA Style

Fountoukis, A. (2022, June 03). The Foothills of Mt. Chortiatis, Greece. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/15997/the-foothills-of-mt-chortiatis-greece/

Chicago Style

Fountoukis, Athanasios. "The Foothills of Mt. Chortiatis, Greece." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified June 03, 2022. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/15997/the-foothills-of-mt-chortiatis-greece/.

MLA Style

Fountoukis, Athanasios. "The Foothills of Mt. Chortiatis, Greece." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 03 Jun 2022. Web. 30 Sep 2022.

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