The Landscape of Rhodope, Greece

Illustration

Athanasios Fountoukis
by
published on 03 June 2022

The Thracian landscape in Rhodope in the early spring. The name of the region emerged from Rhodope, a Thracian naiad and daughter of the river Strymon. The naiads, daughters of the river gods Potamoi, were water nymphs who lived in lakes, springs, rivers, and brooks. Rhodope married Haemus, King of Thrace. Haemus and Rhodope founded a cult, in which, in due course, they offended Zeus and Hera. The gods, as punishment for their insolence, turned them into mountains, which shaped the modern landscape.

Remove Ads

Advertisement

About the Author

Athanasios Fountoukis
A historian, who currently studies at the University of Groningen for his Master's degree in Classics and Ancient Civilizations with a track on Ancient History, focusing on the history of the Mediterranean Sea in the Archaic Era.

References

  • Aken, Dr. A.R.A. van. "Elseviers Mythologische Encyclopedie." Amsterdam: Elsevier, 1961.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Fountoukis, A. (2022, June 03). The Landscape of Rhodope, Greece. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/16000/the-landscape-of-rhodope-greece/

Chicago Style

Fountoukis, Athanasios. "The Landscape of Rhodope, Greece." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified June 03, 2022. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/16000/the-landscape-of-rhodope-greece/.

MLA Style

Fountoukis, Athanasios. "The Landscape of Rhodope, Greece." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 03 Jun 2022. Web. 29 Sep 2022.

Membership