Temple of Mandulis, New Kalabsha

Illustration

Carole Raddato
by
published on 11 March 2022

The Temple of Mandulis (also known as the Temple of Kalabsha) is a Roman Period Egyptian temple built as a tribute to Mandulis, a sun god of ancient Nubia. It was constructed by Emperor Augustus around 30 BCE, presumably on the site of an earlier temple of the New Kingdom of Egypt (c. 1570-1069 BCE).

The temple originally stood 50 kilometres south on the west bank of the Nile at ancient Talmis, which is now submerged under the waters of Lake Nasser. It was relocated in 1970 by a West German-financed operation as part of the incredible International Campaign for the Safeguard of the Monuments of Nubia launched in the early 1960s by UNESCO.

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About the Author

Carole Raddato
Carole maintains the popular ancient history photo-blog Following Hadrian, where she travels the world in the footsteps of emperor Hadrian.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Raddato, C. (2022, March 11). Temple of Mandulis, New Kalabsha. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/15385/temple-of-mandulis-new-kalabsha/

Chicago Style

Raddato, Carole. "Temple of Mandulis, New Kalabsha." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified March 11, 2022. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/15385/temple-of-mandulis-new-kalabsha/.

MLA Style

Raddato, Carole. "Temple of Mandulis, New Kalabsha." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 11 Mar 2022. Web. 28 Sep 2022.

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