Clarendon Palace, Wiltshire, UK - Reconstruction

Illustration

Jan van der Crabben
by Budget Direct
published on 14 May 2021
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Despite the composition of a very significant English legal document within its halls, this 12th-century palace is nearly forgotten. The ‘Constitutions of Clarendon’ were Henry II’s attempt to gain legal authority over church clerks, but he instead exacerbated a feud with his friend Thomas Becket. This feud eventually led to Archbishop Beckett’s martyrdom.

Henry III expanded the palace, commissioning a carved fireplace and stained glass chapel. By the 1400s, Clarendon was a sprawling royal complex. It remained a favourite retreat of monarchs until the Tudor era, when the high cost of upkeep resulted in its rapid decline. Today, only a single wall remains above ground.

This reconstruction was commissioned by Budget Direct, a travel insurance company.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Direct, B. (2021, May 14). Clarendon Palace, Wiltshire, UK - Reconstruction. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/14024/clarendon-palace-wiltshire-uk---reconstruction/

Chicago Style

Direct, Budget. "Clarendon Palace, Wiltshire, UK - Reconstruction." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified May 14, 2021. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/14024/clarendon-palace-wiltshire-uk---reconstruction/.

MLA Style

Direct, Budget. "Clarendon Palace, Wiltshire, UK - Reconstruction." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 14 May 2021. Web. 22 Sep 2021.