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Stoa of Attalos, Athens
Imageby Ava Babili

Stoa of Attalos, Athens

The Stoa of Attalos in Athens was built by Attalos II of Pergamon (r. 159-138 BCE) and stands reconstructed in the Agora today.
Stoa of Attalos, Athens
Imageby Spyros Kamilalis

Stoa of Attalos, Athens

Modern r-construction of the original Stoa of Attalos, 159-138 BCE, Athens.
Ephesus
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Ephesus

According legend, Ephesus (also Ephesos) was founded by the tribe of the Amazons, great female warriors. The name of the city is thought to have been derived from "Apasas", the name of a city in the "Kingdom of Arzawa"...
Athens in the Hellenistic World
Articleby Ian Worthington

Athens in the Hellenistic World

When we think about ancient Athens, it is almost always about the classical city. We think of such things as its numerous monuments (the Parthenon on the Acropolis for example), beautifying everywhere, the Agora swarming with people doing...
Ancient Celtic Torcs
Articleby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Celtic Torcs

In ancient Celtic cultures, torcs were a common form of jewellery and were made from bronze, copper, silver, and gold. Torcs were not just exquisite works of Celtic art but also identified the wearer’s status and perhaps were believed to...
Conflict & Celts: The Creation of Ancient Galatia
Articleby Jeffrey King

Conflict & Celts: The Creation of Ancient Galatia

Galatia was the most long-lasting and powerful Celtic settlement outside of Europe. It was the only kingdom of note to be forged during the Celtic invasions of the Mediterranean in the 4th and 3rd centuries BCE. From its foundation, Galatia...
A Tour in Ancient Athens
Articleby Spyros Kamilalis

A Tour in Ancient Athens

Athens is mostly associated with its ancient past rather than its modern turbulent state of the latest two hundred years. While walking the centre of the luminous city, the visitor can easily observe both ends of Hellenic culture. The city...
The Athenian Agora in the Roman Era
Articleby writer873

The Athenian Agora in the Roman Era

Greece became a Roman province in 146 BCE after the Roman general Mummius destroyed the Greek capital city of Corinth. Athens did not convert to Roman ways so quickly, however. The city and its building programs remained relatively static...
Hypaspist
Articleby Mark Passehl

Hypaspist

Hypaspist translitterates the Greek term meaning shield-bearer, or armour-bearer (ὁ ὑπασπιστής). This noun is formed from the verb ὑπασπίζειν - to carry...
Interview: American School of Classical Studies at Athens
Articleby Sam Freeman

Interview: American School of Classical Studies at Athens

The American School of Classical Studies in Greece has been running its operations since the 19th century CE, with excavations across the country and an academic program that runs throughout the summer and fall. They are arguably the most...