Megara: Did you mean...?

Search

Phocion
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Phocion

Phocion (c. 402 – 318 BCE) was an Athenian statesman and military commander who, according to tradition, was made a general a staggering 45 times. A student of Plato and known as 'the Good', his political position was somewhat ambiguous...
Demetrius I of Macedon
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Demetrius I of Macedon

Demetrius I of Macedon, also known as Demetrios Poliorcetes, the 'Besieger' (c. 336 - c. 282 BCE), was a Macedonian king who, along with his father Antigonus I, fought for control of Alexander the Great's empire in the 'Successor Wars'. After...
Nicias
Definitionby John Bloxham

Nicias

Nicias, or Nikias (c. 470-413 BCE), was a wealthy Athenian politician and general during the Peloponnesian War (431-404 BCE). He became established as a prominent political leader of the aristocratic faction in Athenian politics and generally...
Cynisca of Sparta
Definitionby Philip Mathew

Cynisca of Sparta

Cynisca of Sparta (b. c. 440 BCE) was a Spartan royal princess who became the first female Olympic champion. Defying the traditional role of women in ancient Greece, she competed in the Olympic Games alongside the men and won. Her triumph...
Greek Temples of Sicily
Articleby Heinrich Hall

Greek Temples of Sicily

There are at least a thousand reasons to visit Sicily, the great island – indeed the largest in the Mediterranean – that forms the triangular football to the boot that is the Italian peninsula. They are all very good reasons...
Plato: The Poet Aristocles
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Plato: The Poet Aristocles

Plato (428/427-348-347 BCE), whose dialogues on Truth, Good and Beauty have significantly shaped western thought and religion, wrote and taught under a nickname. His real name was Aristocles which means “the best glory”(from the...
Macedonian Colonization Under Philip II
Articleby Athanasios Fountoukis

Macedonian Colonization Under Philip II

Philip II of Macedon (359-336 BCE) envisaged a broad Macedonian kingdom and his colonial expansion resulted in the forging of an empire that his son Alexander the Great (r. 336-323 BCE) would use as a springboard for even greater things...
Exploring Western Crete's Archaeological Treasures
Articleby Carole Raddato

Exploring Western Crete's Archaeological Treasures

As the cradle of European Civilization and a meeting place of diverse cultures, Crete is a magical island that stands apart in the heart of the Mediterranean sea. Its prominent place in world history dates back to the mysterious and fascinating...
The Relationship Between the Greek Symposium & Poetry
Articleby Elaine Sanderson

The Relationship Between the Greek Symposium & Poetry

The Ancient Greek symposium is often considered an important part of Greek culture, a place where the elite drank, feasted and indulged in sometimes decadent activities. Although such practices were present in symposia, the writing and performance...
Cynisca's Inscription
Imageby Dan Diffendale

Cynisca's Inscription

Inscribed circular stone base of a four-horse chariot dedicated by Cynisca of Sparta, winner of chariot races, made by Apelles of Megara, from Olympia, after 390-380 BCE. Archaeological Museum, Olympia.
Membership