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The Life of Diogenes of Sinope in Diogenes Laertius
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

The Life of Diogenes of Sinope in Diogenes Laertius

Diogenes of Sinope (c. 404-323 BCE) was a Greek Cynic philosopher best known for holding a lantern to the faces of the citizens of Athens claiming he was searching for an honest man. He was most likely a student of the philosopher Antisthenes...
The Delian League, Part 4: The Ten Years War (431/0-421/0 BCE)
Articleby Christopher Planeaux

The Delian League, Part 4: The Ten Years War (431/0-421/0 BCE)

This text is part of an article series on the Delian League. The fourth phase of the Delian League encompasses the first part of the Great Peloponnesian War, also referred to as the Ten Years War, sometimes called quite incorrectly The...
Sicilian Temples (Greek Metrology)
Articleby Denitsa Dzhigova

Sicilian Temples (Greek Metrology)

Characteristics of Sicilian Archaic Temples The large dimensions of the components, the presence of a propteron, an adyton, and other specific elements of the plan and elevation speak for an originally very autonomous development of...
Theseus
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Theseus

Theseus is a legendary hero from Greek mythology who was considered an early king of Athens. Famously killing villains, Amazons, and centaurs, his most celebrated adventure was his slaying of the fearsome Minotaur of the Cretan king Minos...
Ancient Olympic Games
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Olympic Games

The ancient Olympic Games were a sporting event held every four years at the sacred site of Olympia, in the western Peloponnese, in honour of Zeus, the supreme god of the Greek religion. The games, held from 776 BCE to 393 CE, involved participants...
Ancient Greek Government
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Government

Ancient Greece witnessed a wide variety of government systems as people searched for the answers to such fundamental questions as who should rule and how? Should sovereignty lie in the rule of law, the constitution, officials, or the citizens...
Euclid
Definitionby N.S. Palmer

Euclid

Euclid of Alexandria (lived c. 300 BCE) systematized ancient Greek and Near Eastern mathematics and geometry. He wrote The Elements, the most widely used mathematics and geometry textbook in history. Older books sometimes confuse him with...
Aqueduct
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Aqueduct

In antiquity, aqueducts transported water from one place to another, achieving a regular and controlled supply to a place that would not otherwise have received sufficient quantities. Consequently, aqueducts met basic needs such as the irrigation...
Draco's Law Code
Definitionby Antonios Loizides

Draco's Law Code

Draco was an aristocrat who in 7th century BCE Athens was handed the task of composing a new body of laws. We have no particular clues concerning his life and general biography and the only certainty is that, as an aristocrat and an educated...
Hercules
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Hercules

Hercules (Herakles) was a hero of Greek mythology famous for his great strength and endurance. Celebrated as an extraordinary mortal, his success in seemingly impossible labours won him an immortal place amongst the gods. As the greatest...
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