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Tomb of Cyrus
Imageby SebastiĆ  Giralt

Tomb of Cyrus

Burial place of Cyrus the Great (d. 530 BCE) of the Persian Achaemenid Empire. Pasargadae World Heritage Site, modern-day Iran.
Bureaucracy in the Achaemenid Empire: Learning from the Past
Articleby Haleh Brooks

Bureaucracy in the Achaemenid Empire: Learning from the Past

In the early days of the Achaemenid Empire (c. 550-330 BCE), the kings came to realise that, if they were to be able to administer the vast mass of land and the multicultural people who inhabited it, they had to create an organizational system...
Lydia
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

Lydia

Lydia was a region of western Asia Minor which prospered due to its natural resources and position on trading routes between the Mediterranean and Asia. The Kingdom of Lydia flourished in the 7th and 6th centuries BCE and expanded to its...
Cultural links between India & the Greco-Roman world
Articleby Sanujit

Cultural links between India & the Greco-Roman world

Cyrus the Great (558-530 BCE) built the first universal empire, stretching from Greece to the Indus River. This was the famous Achaemenid Dynasty of Persia. An inscription at Naqsh-i-Rustam, the tomb of his able successor Darius I (521-486...
2600 years of history in one object (Neil MacGregor)
Videoby TED

2600 years of history in one object (Neil MacGregor)

http://www.ted.com A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script, damaged and broken, the Cyrus Cylinder is a powerful symbol of religious tolerance and multi-culturalism. In this enthralling talk Neil MacGregor, Director of the British...
Herodotus: On The Customs of the Persians
Articleby Herodotus

Herodotus: On The Customs of the Persians

Herodotus (484-425 BCE) the Greek historian who wrote extensively on the Persian Empire, here describes Persian customs as they would have been practiced around the year 430 BCE at Susa and other Persian communities. The passage, from Book...
Xenophon
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Xenophon

Xenophon of Athens (430-c.354 BCE) was a contemporary of Plato and a fellow student of Socrates. He is known for his writings, especially his Anabasis, Memorobilia and his Apology (the latter two dealing with Socrates and, besides Plato's...
Samaritans
Definitionby Rebecca Denova

Samaritans

The Samaritans are a religious sect of ethnic Jews living near Mount Gerizim, Nablus, Hebron, and the West Bank in Israel. This community differs from mainstream Judaism by claiming that followers only accept the five books of Moses (Torah...
Women in Ancient Persia
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Women in Ancient Persia

Women in ancient Persia were not only highly respected but, in many cases, considered the equals of males. Women could own land, conduct business, received equal pay, could travel freely on their own, and in the case of royal women, hold...
Twelve Great Women of Ancient Persia
Articleby Joshua J. Mark

Twelve Great Women of Ancient Persia

Women in ancient Persia had more rights and greater freedom than any other ancient civilization including, according to some scholars, even ancient Egypt which is famous for its respect for the feminine principle in religion as well as daily...
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