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Pyrrhus
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Pyrrhus

Pyrrhus (also Pyrrhos or Phyrrhus, c. 319 - 272 BCE ) was the king of Epirus in northern Greece between 306 and 302 BCE and again between 297 and 272 BCE. Winning great victories against the armies of Macedon and Rome, he is considered one...
Roman Warfare in the Age of Pyrrhus
Article by Christopher L. Serafin

Roman Warfare in the Age of Pyrrhus

The Roman army fought many conflicts throughout its long history, though perhaps none so indelible as the Pyrrhic War from 280 to 275 BCE. This war between Rome and a league of Greek colonies in southern Italy led by the city of Tarentum...
Pyrrhus
Image by Catalaon

Pyrrhus

A marble bust of Pyrrhus, King of Epirus (r. 306 - 302 BCE and 297 - 272 BCE). Pyrrhus is considered one of history's greatest military commanders. (National Archaeological Museum, Naples)
Pyrrhus of Epirus Unhorsed at the Battle of Heraclea
Image by Ancient Warfare Magazine/ Karwansaray Publishers

Pyrrhus of Epirus Unhorsed at the Battle of Heraclea

An illustration of Pyrrhus of Epirus' (c. 319 - 272 BCE) horse being killed at the Battle of Heraclea in 280 BCE. Illustration by Seán Ó Brógáin.
Metope with Pyrrhus in Battle
Image by Caroline Cervera

Metope with Pyrrhus in Battle

Found at Tomb I, Via Umbria, Taranto, Italy. This metope from the late 3rd to early 2nd century BCE decorated a temple-like tomb in the tradition of Macedonian kings and borrowing imagery from Alexander the Great's depictions. The horseman...
Tarentum
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Tarentum

Tarentum (Taras, modern Taranto), located on the southern coast of Apulia, Italy, was a Greek and then Roman city. Controlling a large area of Magna Graecia and heading the Italiote League, Tarentum, with its excellent harbour, was a strategically...
Demetrius I of Macedon
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Demetrius I of Macedon

Demetrius I of Macedon, also known as Demetrios Poliorcetes, the 'Besieger' (c. 336 - c. 282 BCE), was a Macedonian king who, along with his father Antigonus I, fought for control of Alexander the Great's empire in the 'Successor Wars'. After...
Agathocles of Syracuse
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Agathocles of Syracuse

Agathocles of Syracuse (c. 361 - 289 BCE) ruled as tyrant of the Sicilian city for over 25 years. Ambitious, unprincipled, and seeing himself as a new Alexander, he famously attacked Carthage in a three-year campaign and made conquests in...
Lysimachus
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Lysimachus

Lysimachus (c. 361-281 BCE) was one of Alexander the Great's trusted bodyguards and a member of his Companion Cavalry. Although he obtained Macedonian citizenship, his father was a Thessalian named Agathocles. After Alexander's death in...
Battle of Pydna
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Battle of Pydna

The Battle of Pydna in June 168 BCE was a decisive Roman victory that ended the Third Macedonian War and established Rome as the dominant power in the Mediterranean. The Roman Republic was expanding, enlarging its sphere of influence along...
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