Water Conduit at Augusta Raurica

Illustration

James Blake Wiener
by
published on 03 December 2018
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Via a subterranean masonry, an ancient Roman water conduit brought Augusta Raurica water from the River Ergolz. Just outside the town wall the conduit merged into an aqueduct, which in turn funneled the water into a water tower where it was stored. From here, it was distributed to the various urban water pipes. The latter were generally made of wood and, like our modern-day pipes, were laid beneath the streets and roads.

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About the Author

James Blake Wiener
James is a writer and former Professor of History. He holds an MA in World History with a particular interest in cross-cultural exchange and world history. He is a co-founder of World History Encyclopedia and formerly was its Communications Director.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Wiener, J. B. (2018, December 03). Water Conduit at Augusta Raurica. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/9661/water-conduit-at-augusta-raurica/

Chicago Style

Wiener, James Blake. "Water Conduit at Augusta Raurica." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified December 03, 2018. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/9661/water-conduit-at-augusta-raurica/.

MLA Style

Wiener, James Blake. "Water Conduit at Augusta Raurica." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 03 Dec 2018. Web. 20 Oct 2021.