Nok Culture Fragment of a Figure

Illustration

James Blake Wiener
by
published on 16 January 2018
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As a result of erosion and mining, one of the oldest and most sophistcated art-producing cultures known in sub-Saharan Africa came to light in the mid-20th century. Hundreds of hollow figures, heads, and fragments made of coarse clay have been found in three sites near Nok in central Nigeria—an origin enshrined in the art historical name for these objects—and have been scientifically dated from 500 BCE-200 CE. This piece comes from Kaduna State in central Nigeria and is made of terracotta. It dates from 200 BCE-200 CE. (Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University, Stanford, California)

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About the Author

James Blake Wiener
James is a writer and former Professor of History. He holds an MA in World History with a particular interest in cross-cultural exchange and world history. He is a co-founder of World History Encyclopedia and formerly was its Communications Director.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Wiener, J. B. (2018, January 16). Nok Culture Fragment of a Figure. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/7935/nok-culture-fragment-of-a-figure/

Chicago Style

Wiener, James Blake. "Nok Culture Fragment of a Figure." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified January 16, 2018. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/7935/nok-culture-fragment-of-a-figure/.

MLA Style

Wiener, James Blake. "Nok Culture Fragment of a Figure." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 16 Jan 2018. Web. 17 Sep 2021.