The Bulls of Guisando

Illustration

Lidia Pelayo Alonso
by
published on 03 December 2015
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The bulls of Guisando are four zoomorphic sculptures carved in stone and located in the Ávila region (Spain). These bulls were carved by the Vetonians, one of the Celtic peoples who lived on the Iberian Peninsula before the Roman conquest of this area (around 136-133 BCE). The sculptures are believed to be protective symbols for livestock, although they may have been used as funerary elements associated with traditional customs.

One of the bulls has a Latin inscription that reads "LONGINUS PRISCO – CALAET Q PATRI F.C.", that would translate as: “Longinus had (this monument) made for his father Prisco, of the Calaeticos”. Other two sculptures have also inscriptions, but the letters are blurred.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Alonso, L. P. (2015, December 03). The Bulls of Guisando. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/4275/the-bulls-of-guisando/

Chicago Style

Alonso, Lidia Pelayo. "The Bulls of Guisando." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified December 03, 2015. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/4275/the-bulls-of-guisando/.

MLA Style

Alonso, Lidia Pelayo. "The Bulls of Guisando." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 03 Dec 2015. Web. 27 Oct 2021.