Jomon Ritual Pottery Vessel

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 12 December 2018
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These ancient ceramics are decorated with cord markings. They gave the Jomon period, (13,00-500 BCE) its name; Jomon means "cord-marked". A stick was wrapped with braided cord and then rolled over the surface of the vessels to decorate them. Most of the posts seem to have been for cooking or storage. From about 2500 BCE, ceramics known as "flame pots" were produced in what is now Niigata prefecture. They have dramatic flaring rims and were probably used in rituals. Earthenware. From Japan. 13,500 to 500 BCE. (The British Museum, London).

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About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2018, December 12). Jomon Ritual Pottery Vessel. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/9524/jomon-ritual-pottery-vessel/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Jomon Ritual Pottery Vessel." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified December 12, 2018. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/9524/jomon-ritual-pottery-vessel/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama Shukir Muhammed. "Jomon Ritual Pottery Vessel." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 12 Dec 2018. Web. 23 Oct 2021.