Knossos Palace, Crete - Reconstruction

Illustration

Jan van der Crabben
by Budget Direct
published on 14 May 2021
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The palace of Knossos, was constructed c. 1700 BCE. In addition to its political function, it was perhaps also designed as an economic and religious centre for the Minoan civilization. Knossos was destroyed for the final time c. 1380 BCE - surviving invasion, fire, and earthquake nearly a century longer than similar Minoan complexes.

Without a way to decipher Minoan writings, the ruin’s many striking frescoes are key to understanding Minoan culture. For instance, one depicts the sport of bull-leaping. This sport may have given rise to the legend of the Minotaur - a cannibalistic half-man/half-bull from later Greek mythology.

This reconstruction was commissioned by Budget Direct, a travel insurance company.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Direct, B. (2021, May 14). Knossos Palace, Crete - Reconstruction. World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.worldhistory.org/image/14021/knossos-palace-crete---reconstruction/

Chicago Style

Direct, Budget. "Knossos Palace, Crete - Reconstruction." World History Encyclopedia. Last modified May 14, 2021. https://www.worldhistory.org/image/14021/knossos-palace-crete---reconstruction/.

MLA Style

Direct, Budget. "Knossos Palace, Crete - Reconstruction." World History Encyclopedia. World History Encyclopedia, 14 May 2021. Web. 17 Sep 2021.