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Comedy & Tragedy: the Drama of Greek Theatre
Collectionby Mark Cartwright

Comedy & Tragedy: the Drama of Greek Theatre

Greek theatre likely sprang from the lyrical performance of ancient epic poetry and the rituals performed in the worship of the god Dionysos where goats were sacrificed and participants wore masks. From the 6th century BCE, Greek tragedy...
Theatre Masks, Roman Mosaic
Imageby Carole Raddato

Theatre Masks, Roman Mosaic

Roman Mosaic depicting theatrical masks of Tragedy and Comedy, 2nd century CE, from Rome. (Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museums)
Seating of the Theatre of Epidaurus
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Seating of the Theatre of Epidaurus

The theatre of Epidaurus was first built in the 4th century BCE and is possibly the best preserved ancient Greek theatre. Extensions were made in the 2nd century BCE taking its capacity to 12,000.
Seat from the Theatre of Dionysos, Athens
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Seat from the Theatre of Dionysos, Athens

One of the special front seats from the Theatre of Dionysos, on the slopes of the acropolis of Athens. Second half of the 4th century BCE. The theatre was orginally constructed in the 6th century BCE.
Greek Tragedy Theatre Mask
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Greek Tragedy Theatre Mask

A votive offering in a the form of a larger-than-life bronze tragedy theatre mask. Possibly by Silanion, 4th century BCE. (Archaeological Museum of Piraeus)
Roman Theatre of Carthago Nova
Imageby Carole Raddato

Roman Theatre of Carthago Nova

The theatre of Carthago Nova (Carthagena, Spain) was built between 5 BCE and 1 BCE. The date is known from the dedication of the building to Gaius and Lucius Caesar, grandsons and designated successors of Augustus.
Elizabethan Theatre, Queen Elizabeth I and William Shakespeare
Videoby Kelly Macquire

Elizabethan Theatre, Queen Elizabeth I and William Shakespeare

The term Elizabethan Theatre naturally refers to the style of theatre being composed and performed in England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, which continued under her Stuart successors and is best known through the works of the playwright...
Theatre of Marcellus, Rome
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Marcellus, Rome

The theatre of Marcellus, near the Capitoline Hill, Rome. Begun under Julius Caesar, the project was completed under Augustus and the theatre was named after the son of Octavia who, before his death in 23 BCE, was Augustus' heir. Built in...
Theatre of Segesta
Imageby Mark Cartwright

Theatre of Segesta

The 2nd century BCE theatre of Segesta, Sicily. The theatre had a capacity of up to 4,000 spectators.
Theatre, Pompeii
Imageby Penn State University Library

Theatre, Pompeii

The theatre of the Roman town of Pompeii was built in the 2nd century BCE and it was extensively renovated c. 79 BCE and repaired following the earthquake of 62 CE. At full capacity the theatre would have seated 5,000 spectators.
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