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Between Alexander & Rome: The Hellenistic Period
Collectionby Patrick Goodman

Between Alexander & Rome: The Hellenistic Period

The Hellenistic Period refers to the time between the death of Alexander the Great (323 BCE) and the rise of the Roman Empire (32 BCE) in which Greek culture spread throughout the Mediterranean and Near East. Beginning with a series of conflicts...
Seleucus I Nicator
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Seleucus I Nicator

Seleucus I Nicator (l. c. 358-281 BCE, r. 305-281 BCE) was one of the generals of Alexander the Great (l. 356-323 BCE) who make up the group of Diadochi ("successors") who divided the vast Macedonian Empire between them after Alexander's...
Scottish Medieval Monarchs
Collectionby Mark Cartwright

Scottish Medieval Monarchs

In this collection, we present the 15 most important of the 21 monarchs to rule Scotland from the 11th to 16th century. For the first time forging a unified kingdom, the monarchs of this period were often warrior-kings who conquered the remoter...
Aristotle
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Aristotle

Aristotle of Stagira (l. 384-322 BCE) was a Greek philosopher who pioneered systematic, scientific examination in literally every area of human knowledge and was known, in his time, as "the man who knew everything" and later simply as "The...
Arrian
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Arrian

Lucius Flavius Arrianus, commonly known as Arrian (86 - c. 160 CE) was a Greek historian, philosopher, and statesman from Nicomedia, capital of the Roman province of Bithynia. Arrian is recognized as one of the most renowned authors of the...
John Balliol
Definitionby Mark Cartwright

John Balliol

John Balliol ruled as the king of Scotland from 1292 to 1296 CE. He was supported by Edward I of England (r. 1272-1307 CE) in the competition to find the successor to the heirless Alexander III of Scotland (r. 1249-1286 CE), a process known...
Antigonus I
Definitionby Donald L. Wasson

Antigonus I

Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-Eyed") (382 -301 BCE) was one of the successor kings to Alexander the Great, controlling Macedonia and Greece. When Alexander the Great died in 323 BCE, a conflict known as the Wars of the Diadochi ensued...
Alexander Sarcophagus (detail)
Imageby Carole Raddato

Alexander Sarcophagus (detail)

The Alexander Sarcophagus is a late 4th century BCE stone sarcophagus adorned with bas-relief carvings of Alexander the Great. The Alexander Sarcophagus is one of four massive carved sarcophagi, forming two pairs, that were discovered during...
Phoenicia
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Phoenicia

Phoenicia was an ancient civilization composed of independent city-states located along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea stretching through what is now Syria, Lebanon and northern Israel. The Phoenicians were a great maritime people, known...
Alexandria, Egypt
Definitionby Joshua J. Mark

Alexandria, Egypt

Alexandria is a port city located on the Mediterranean Sea in northern Egypt founded in 331 BCE by Alexander the Great. It was the site of the Pharos (lighthouse), one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, and the legendary Library of...
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